Send-off day has at last shown up for the uncrewed Artemis I mission to take off on an excursion around the moon.

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 It's something else as the 322-foot-tall (98-foot-tall) stack, comprising of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion shuttle

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 gleams in the early morning dimness at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

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 The stack is perched on memorable Launchpad 39B, where Apollo 10 and transport missions recently took off

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 Check out NASA's site and TV channel to watch the last arrangements and witness the send-off.

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 Weather patterns stay 80% ideal for a send-off toward the start of a window that opens at 8:33 a.m. furthermore

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  shuts down at 10:33 a.m. ET, as indicated by the most recent figure.

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 Yet, a few issues have sprung up since the rocket started energizing after 12 PM. The Artemis group is assessing the postponements to decide what it means for the send-off.

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 Seaward tempests with the potential for lightning kept the group from starting the powering system

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 because of start at 12 PM, for about 60 minutes.